Feather corticosterone during non-breeding correlates with multiple measures of physiology during subsequent breeding in a migratory seabird.

Abstract : Carry-over effects in migratory birds are likely mediated by physiological processes that are activated in response to environmental variation. Such processes affect body condition and/or reproductive success, and can include corticosterone (CORT) because this hormone responds to environmental stressors and influences energy balance. Few studies have considered how CORT levels during non-breeding relate to a broader physiological profile during subsequent breeding, and fewer still have considered measures other than body condition. To explore CORT's potential role in carry-over effects, we investigated the relationship between CORT and foraging ecology of northern gannets (Morus bassanus) during the non-breeding period, and tested for associations between these factors and variation in a suite of physiological and biochemical metrics during subsequent breeding. Northern gannets are the largest seabird top predator in the North Atlantic and were among the hardest hit by the Deepwater Horizon oil blowout in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. We used light-level geolocators to confirm winter origins of individuals in our study. No interrelationships were found among levels of CORT from feathers grown during non-breeding (CORTf) and variation in foraging ecology, measured by stable isotopes of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) from the same feathers. CORTf was correlated negatively with hematocrit and positively with triglyceride measured during subsequent incubation, and explained more variation in these variables than did body mass during incubation. These findings provide support for the hypothesis that energy management, measured using CORTf, during non-breeding carries over to influence physiological measures other than body condition. Gannets that previously wintered within the Gulf of Mexico in the years following the Deepwater Horizon oil blowout had higher levels of CORTf compared to birds that wintered along the Atlantic coast, suggesting an increased energetic cost associated with visiting the Gulf of Mexico. Our results indicate that CORT during non-breeding is associated with a broader physiological profile during subsequent breeding than previously reported in birds.
Type de document :
Article dans une revue
Comparative biochemistry and physiology. Part A, Molecular & integrative physiology, 2017, 208, pp.1-13. 〈10.1016/j.cbpa.2017.02.024〉
Liste complète des métadonnées

https://hal-riip.archives-ouvertes.fr/pasteur-01535059
Contributeur : Michel Courcelles <>
Soumis le : jeudi 8 juin 2017 - 16:37:37
Dernière modification le : vendredi 13 octobre 2017 - 01:05:58

Identifiants

Collections

Citation

Graham D Fairhurst, Louise Champoux, Keith A Hobson, Jean-François Rail, Jonathan Verreault, et al.. Feather corticosterone during non-breeding correlates with multiple measures of physiology during subsequent breeding in a migratory seabird.. Comparative biochemistry and physiology. Part A, Molecular & integrative physiology, 2017, 208, pp.1-13. 〈10.1016/j.cbpa.2017.02.024〉. 〈pasteur-01535059〉

Partager

Métriques

Consultations de la notice

9